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ADHD Students: Got good grades? Here’s how to keep them.

ADHD teen on skateboard
Student with ADHD sliding on a skateboard

Summer slide?  It’s not in the playground.  Don’t fall victim.  Something comes up and steals academic progress, as much as 2 months.

Summer slide describes the loss of academic skills over the summer break.  As a result, education does not continue.  This loss  is especially severe for students with ADHD because they are not engaged in learning activities.

My one and only year as a reading teacher…

Summer break is over.  There goes my time at the beach.  In walks my whining group of 6th graders.  Moaning too.

I know the drill.  “Hand in your summer reading packet.”  Not a sound.  

I know that our school system wants to wipe out summer slide.  “Did anyone read a book and complete the assignment?”  Nothing.

Let the school year begin.

Johns Hopkins research estimates academic losses at approximately 2 months or 22% of the school year.  Higher-income families are more likely to afford remediation.  Losses are greater for families living in poverty.

Many students with ADHD spend time and effort practicing sports.  Like these activities, educational skills can actually regress without proper attention.  Reading and math must be maintained through ongoing efforts.

  • Read every day.  Include non-fiction, fiction, poetry, newspapers.
  • Cook.  Integrate math, reading, and following directions.
  • Plant a garden.  Take responsibility and pride.
  • Listen to audiobooks.  Focus on comprehension.
  • Take pictures.  Use smartphones and make a scrapbook.

The summer slide can be an academic danger due to a lack of proficiency for students with ADHD.  Slow or stop the slide by talking, singing, reading, or keeping a journal.  Practice a few times a week to regain previously learned skills relatively quickly.

“Our kids” put a lot of blood, sweat, and tears during the school year.  Find creative ways to make gains last.

What fun activities do you use to stay mentally sharp?

 

 

5 comments

  • / Reply

    Only about half of kids ages 2 to 5 diagnosed with ADHD get the kinds of psychological services that would help them cope long-term with their symptoms, says a new study.

    • Edie Brown
      / Reply

      Interesting. I worked with children with ADHD for only a few years. Psychological services were included on their IEPs. Nothing for the older students.

      • Edie Brown
        / Reply

        Diagnosing adults with ADHD is complex. There’s some disagreement on what factors should be used. Stay tuned. I’m doing a blog post this month.

  • With widely differing rates of diagnosis across countries, states within countries, races, and ethnicities, some suspect factors other than the presence of the symptoms of ADHD are playing a role in diagnosis.

    • Edie Brown
      / Reply

      Yes. I agree that diversity is the key to ADHD. My blog and Google+ followers are about 1/2 and 1/2 US and worldwide. Their comments are interesting.

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